Interview with Jade Cheung, Part 1

Jade Cheung is an amazing and multifaceted artist whose work is all over the creative map. Whether sculpting, drawing, painting or wearing her creations, her work is always stunning and her presence delightful. This is the first of a three-part feature, the entire interview can also be found throughout the month of April in the Featured Artist link to the right.

 

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How would you describe your work in general?
 

My body of work is as diverse as the number of mediums I work with. I’ve always dabbled in a variety of mediums since childhood (anything 2-D or 3-D, digital or traditional mediums that I could afford to try), but I went to school for Ceramics (both sculpture and pottery) and Graphic Design, so there’s always that part of me that will always want to make Art with a statement, and the other half of me that wants to make art; that is, the creative tidbits that are made just to be made without a whole lot of profound meaning or message to spur its creation beyond a desire to physically manifest an image.

My Art tends to sway towards personal rants or the observation of different perspectives, such as the series of sculptures I made for my thesis exhibition which included pieces like the duality of the Hope-Bringer/Doubt-Bringer, and the Dream Eater. And also, a personal piece, The Star of Notme. Whereas my art for cosplay tends to favor larger theatrical scales, and my art for non-wearable work favors reinterpreting existing art styles like Art Nouveau and early illuminated manuscripts.

© Jade Cheung

© Jade Cheung

 

Hope Bringer © Jade Cheung

Hope Bringer
© Jade Cheung

 

Hope Bringer © Jade Cheung

Hope Bringer
© Jade Cheung

 

 

Doubt Bringer © Jade Cheung

Doubt Bringer
© Jade Cheung

 

Doubt Bringer © Jade Cheung
Doubt Bringer
© Jade Cheung 

 

The Star of Notme © Jade Cheung

The Star of Notme
© Jade Cheung

 

 

Any favorite projects that you’ve worked on?
 

Oh dear. That’s like trying to ask after a favorite child! For 2-D work, Paradisio and Hotel Tassel Stairwell sit pretty high on that list.

Paradisio © Jade Cheung

Paradisio
© Jade Cheung

 

Hotel Tassel Stairwell © Jade Cheung

Hotel Tassel Stairwell
© Jade Cheung

 

For 3-D work, it’d have to be the Eat Beast and Dream Eater.

Eat Beast  © Jade Cheung

Eat Beast
© Jade Cheung

 

Dream Eater © Jade Cheung

Dream Eater
© Jade Cheung

Dream Eater © Jade Cheung

Dream Eater
© Jade Cheung

 

 

Have you always been drawn to three-dimensional work or was that an interest that evolved over time?

I’ve been drawn to making things as whole. I’m all about ideas and imagery, less about the format and medium. If an idea needs to exist three-dimensionally, then even if it takes years to work up the technical skill to create it, then that is the way it’ll go. If it’s something that can only be created two-dimensionally, then if it’s in my ability to do so, I’ll make it happen eventually. “The end justifies the means,” per se.

Blue Gold Crow © Jade Cheung

Blue Gold Crow
© Jade Cheung

Bird skulls are a significant part of your work, can you tell us something about the significance of that imagery?

I acquired my first bird skull in high school, and became fascinated with just how delicate it was, but yet how much a living bird could do despite that fact. Also, having had pet birds much of my life, they intrigued me as they’re so biologically unique from other land animals. Like reptiles, they lay eggs instead of giving live-births, but are warm-blooded like mammals who do, and have feathers instead of scales (aside from scaly feet). Their beaks are also very interesting in that they are essentially a single upper and lower tooth and parrot beaks are strong enough to crack open nuts that humans require tools for, and woodpeckers are able to slam their faces into solid wood that would otherwise harm any other animal. Not to mention the intelligence and speech capabilities of some species!

3-Eyed Ravens © Jade Cheung

3-Eyed Ravens
© Jade Cheung

As for the skulls themselves, I’m intrigued by the different shapes. Each one is a different sort of puzzle for me to solve in order to cast it; some more intimidating to approach as a project than others, but I enjoy the process all the same. I’m slowly branching out to other species of animals, and finding they are their own puzzles and sources of intrigue as well, like the wolverine with its hinged jaw.

Barred Owl © Jade Cheung

Barred Owl
© Jade Cheung

 

Jade Cheung’s work can be found here:

www.facebook.com/ArcticPhoenixStudios

www.etsy.com/shop/arcticphoenixstudios

instagram.com/arcticphoenixstudios/

the-arctic-phoenix.tumblr.com/

arcticphoenixstudios.deviantart.com/